Traffic Signal Photos & Information: Vintage
Queensland

General Information:

Queensland has hundreds of traffic signals across the entire state. In the Brisbane City Council area, they are controlled by the council and outside the BCC jurisdiction, they are controlled by the Department of Main Roads (QMR). In 2008, both systems were integrated under the one computer system (using a progam called STREAMS) for a more streamlined form of traffic management. The first signals in Brisbane were installed on Queen Street, on the 24th of May 1936.

A group within QMR, called Transmax was formed from the Intelligent Transport Systems Development Branch of the Department of Main Roads. Since 1969 that group has been supporting road network operators through the provision of intelligent transport products, systems and services to maximise transport system performance. 1

The actual installation and design of traffic signal setups in performed by a group within QMR called RoadTek. 1

According to a source based in Sydney, traffic signals in Queensland used to be turned off at night back in the 1960s, and only the amber signal would be flashing at each junction, acting as a caution light.

Pedestrian Signals:

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Illuminated Pedestrian Call Button:
Typical old style cast metal light up pedestrian call button. When the button is pressed "CALL RECORDED" lights up within the red screen. Image taken 2006.

Image © Trent Thomson

Traffic Lanterns:

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Mast Arm Signal:
Typical mast arm signal installation in Brisbane during the 1960s and 70s. Most likely original AWA or Eagle signal heads. Taken on the corner of Burbong Street and Moggill Road Indooroopilly, February 2002.

Image © Paul Rands

  Mesh Mast Arm:
Old mesh mast arm signal posts with newer Quartz Halogen signals on the corner of Kent and Bazaar Streets in Maryborough. August 2007.

Image © Rob Tilley

Short Mast Arm Signal:
Typical mast arm signal installation in Brisbane during the 1960s and 70s. This set has newer Quartz Halogen signal heads which would've replace old Eagle or AWA signals. Taken on the corner of Centenary Highway and Moggill Road Indooroopilly, February 2002.

Image © Paul Rands

  Old Mast Arm Post:
Very rare angular mast arm signal post located outside St Francis Xavier Primary School, Bayview Street in Runaway Bay. This kind of mast arm was once common along the Gold Coast Highway, but with road improvements and deterioration of the posts, they all have been replaced. This may be the last surviving one of its type. December 2006.

Image © Lachlan Sims

Old Eagle Signal:
This signal is an original 1960s model by Eagle. Located in suburban Brisbane on the Pacific Motorway (Metroad 3), Marshall Road (State Route 11) and Bapaume Road (State Route 10) intersections at Tarragindi. Note the old cast metal pedestrian call button. February 2002.

Image © Paul Rands

  Old Signal with Targetboard:
Old signal with original yellow paint showing through the black paint at the corner McLean St and Marine Pde in Coolangatta, February 2009.

Image © Rob Tilley

Common Gold Coast Rounded Mast Arm:
Common to Queensland's Gold Coast, this intersection has an older more arced mast arm post. This intersection is the corner of the Gold Coast Highway (SR2) & Palm Avenue, Surfers Paradise. March 2006.

Image © Paul Rands

  Common Gold Coast Rounded Mast Arm:
Common to Queensland's Gold Coast, this intersection has an older more arced mast arm post. Corner of Gold Coast Hwy (SR2) and Pacific Av in Miami
, February 2009.

Image © Rob Tilley

Mesh Mast Arm:
Very rare old style mast arm still in use, March 2006, probably 40 years after it was installed. The signal is much newer, a Halogen ATS, which at the time, would be less than 10 years old. This signal setup is on the corner of Kent and Adelaide Streets, outside Maryborough City Hall. These mast arms were once also used to hold power lines for trams in the Brisbane tram system.

Image © Paul Rands

     

1 QMR

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